Democratic Race Enters New Stage: Unification

la-et-ct-cnn-ratings-20151014-003The animosity surrounding the Democratic presidential contest between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders looks less problematic for the party than past contested Democratic primaries. With that being said, Hillary Clinton posted a double-digit victory over Bernie Sanders in New York on Tuesday.

Next Tuesday, Hillary Clinton could win 90% of the amount she needs to secure the Democratic nomination. She is projected to win big in four of the five primaries to be held: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island.

Democrats are suggesting that the time has come to bring the two wings of the party together.

Putting a fractured party back together again is never as easy as it seems but unifying the party is almost always the first step to victory
Clinton has to address the lackluster feel of her campaign and she could use the raw energy and spirit that Mr. Sanders has brought to this campaign. His large rallies teeming with young first-time voters have been impressive. This excitement mirrors the election of President Obama in 2008 and proved to be a critical part of the Democratic coalition.

Unity is a problem for both parties this election. But, whatever bad feelings may exist between the Sanders and Clinton campaigns, they pale in contrast to the Republicans. Donald Trump has warned/threatened violence in the streets should his opponents or other appointed replacements steal the nomination.

In a CBS News poll this month, 24 percent of Mr. Sanders’s supporters said they would not support Mrs. Clinton should she win the nomination. Among Republicans, 32 percent of Mr. Trump’s supporters said they would not support Mr. Cruz in a general election; 27 percent of Mr. Cruz’s backers said they would not vote for Mr. Trump in November.

History has shown that when a candidate loses a highly contested race, backers of that candidate then to stay home. This was not the case with the Obama and Clinton 2008 race and many Democrats feel this will be the case again. But, many of Bernie supporters are first time voters with no party loyalty and they may feel a sense of disappointment. It will be vitally important that Clinton and Democrats do whatever is necessary to bridge the divide between the two sides. Hillary seemed to realize this and make a move toward that end in her victory speech after the New York primary.

Many Democrats are urging Clinton to include planks in the Democratic Party platform that incorporate Mr. Sanders’s popular positions.
She moved to the left throughout the primary as she adjusted to Mr. Sanders’s challenges but many feel she will move back to the center in preparation for a general election battle, this will complicate the effort to appeal to Bernie’s voters, who are already leery of Clinton.
In 2008, Mrs. Clinton endorsed Mr. Obama soon after she dropped out and Democrats united.

The horrible thoughts/reality of Trump or Cruz in the White House will do more to unify the Democratic Party than anything Bernie or Hillary could do.




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